Corn Stalk Nitrate Test

To help evaluate nitrogen management in corn, you may want to try the corn stalk nitrate test as a post-mortem tool. The corn stalk nitrate test is a late-season or end-of-season plant analysis on mature corn stalks. Iowa State University developed the corn stalk sampling protocol and interpretation. If corn did not have sufficient nitrogen, the corn stalk nitrate level will be low. If corn had excess nitrogen, the corn stalk nitrate level will be high.

The corn stalk nitrate test can be useful in cropping systems with manure or corn-after-alfalfa, where a significant portion of the crop nitrogen budget comes from nitrogen mineralization. It is also helpful in more humid climates, where the residual soil nitrate-nitrogen test is not utilized. For corn silage production, it is easy to collect corn stalk samples on the go during silage harvest, making it a quick and useful tool.

Since the corn stalk nitrate test is a post-mortem tool with the goal to provide information for future years, it is not recommended in years with abnormal precipitation. In drought years, potential crop productivity is reduced, so the plant nitrogen requirement is lower than normal. In high precipitation years, soil nitrogen losses will reduce the available nitrogen supply. As a result, the corn stalk nitrate level can be very high in drought years or very low in wet years. Such results say more about environmental conditions, not the adequacy of the nitrogen fertilizer program.

When to sample

  • Early: One-quarter milk line (R5 growth stage) on majority of corn kernels. Nitrate concentration may be high if collected early.
  • Optimum: One to three weeks after physiological maturity (black layer, R6 growth stage) on 80% of corn kernels.
  • Late: Up to harvest. Nitrate concentration may be low if rainfall has leached nitrate from plant material.

How to sample

  • Measure 6 inches from the ground, cut the next 8 inches of corn stalk (the 6-14 inch stalk section measured from plant base). Remove outside leaf sheath.
  • Collect 12 to 15 corn stalks.
  • Place corn stalks in a ventilated plant tissue bag. Do not use plastic or zipped bag.
  • Do not collect diseased or damaged corn stalks.

Table 1. Corn Stalk Nitrate Test Interpretation

Nitrate-N (NO3-N), ppm Interpretation Comment
<250 Low Nitrogen supply was likely deficient and limited corn grain yield
250-2000 Sufficient
>2000 High Nitrogen supply exceeded plant requirement

for corn stalk nitrate test article

Update: Feed Nitrate Testing in a Drought Year

Drought continues to stress crops across the upper Midwest and the Canadian Prairies. As crop conditions continue to deteriorate in some places, we have received more phone calls about salvaging the drought-stressed crop as livestock feed and the need for feed nitrate testing. As you consider what to do with your standing crop, whether to harvest for grain or cut for hay, an important part of that consideration will be the nitrate concentration of the crop.

When drought-stressed annual crops (e.g., wheat, barley, oat, corn) are cut or grazed, producers must exercise caution about livestock nitrate poisoning when feeding these forages. Drought-stressed crops often accumulate nitrate because plant uptake of nitrate exceeds plant growth and nitrogen utilization. Nitrate is usually concentrated in lower plant parts (lower stem or stalk). When livestock, particularly sheep and cattle, ingest forages with a high nitrate concentration, nitrate poisoning can occur.

Instructions for collecting and submitting a feed nitrate test

1. Collect the plant part that livestock will consume, which may be the whole aboveground plant. If grazing, be mindful of the grazing height because the plant nitrate concentration will be lower near the base of the plant. If baling for hay or chopping for silage, cut at the intended cutter bar height.

Picture used for feed nitrate email - corn collage

2. Cut plant material with sturdy garden shears into 1- to 2-inch pieces. Mix the chopped plant parts together and take one quart-sized subsample for analysis (about four good handfuls).

3. Place subsample in AGVISE Plant Sample Bag. Write “Feed Nitrate” as the crop choice and select “Nitrate-nitrogen” as the analysis option.

    • If you are considering chopping corn for silage, also write “%Moisture” as an additional analysis because you will need to know if the moisture content is still adequate for silage fermentation. You may be surprised how much water will still be in drought-stressed corn stalks.

4. Ship plant sample to AGVISE Laboratories. If you cannot ship the sample right away, store it in a refrigerator until you can ship it.

IMPORTANT: Resample the hay or silage before feeding to any livestock. You need to know what is actually being fed to livestock, and you may need to blend it with other feed sources to dilute the nitrate concentration. For dry hay in bales, the nitrate concentration will not change in storage; use a hay probe to obtain the best possible feed sample. For silage, the nitrate concentration may decrease 20 to 50% during fermentation, so a fresh sample is necessary before feeding.

IMPORTANT: Many crop protection products have grazing restrictions on their labels that dictate if or when a crop treated with a product can be fed to livestock. Before using or selling a crop for livestock feed, check all labels of crop protection products that have been used on the crop this season. This includes seed treatments, herbicide applications, fungicide applications, and insecticide applications.

AGVISE Laboratories offers next-day turnaround for feed nitrate analysis. Rapid turnaround on nitrate analysis is important for producers debating to cut and bale or graze small grains or corn as livestock feed.  We also provide livestock water analysis, which includes total dissolved solids, nitrate, and sulfate, to assess livestock drinking water quality. Please call AGVISE staff in Northwood, ND (701-587- 6010) or Benson, MN (320-843-4109) with questions about nitrate, feed and hay quality, or water analysis. We can send you sampling supplies if needed.

AGVISE Laboratories Online Supplies Store

Helpful resources on using drought-stressed crops for livestock feed:

Nitrate Poisoning of Livestock (NDSU)

Using Drought-Stressed Corn as Forage (SDSU)

Drought-Related Issues in Forage, Silage and Baleage (Univ. of Missouri)

Potassium and Drought: A Two-fold Water Uptake Problem

Potassium is back on the radar for many farmers and agronomists across the upper Midwest and northern Great Plains. In the past two weeks, corn growth and development have reached the stage where potassium deficiencies are becoming quite apparent, and widespread dry soil conditions during the 2021 drought have worsened the problem. In some instances, corn is displaying potassium deficiency symptoms on soils with medium to high soil test K (120 to 180 ppm) in spite of potassium fertilizer application.

Potassium is required in large quantities for plant growth and development. The plant tissue K range in normal corn plants is 3-5% K, which is similar to nitrogen. A 200-bushel/acre corn crop will typically uptake 200 lb N, 108 lb P2O5, and 280 lb K2O per acre through the growing season (IPNI, 2014). In other words, an actively growing corn crop takes a lot of potassium! Luckily, you do not have to apply all that potassium as fertilizer, and much will come from the plant-available K pool in the soil.

Potassium deficiency in corn. Symptoms are leaf chlorosis (yellowing) and necrosis (death) beginning at the leaf tip and outer leaf margin and progressing toward the midrib, often with wavy leaf edges. Potassium is mobile in the plant, so symptoms appear on the lower leaves first as the plant remobilizes potassium from lower leaves to support new plant growth. 

Drought reduces potassium availability

The plant-available K pool becomes less available when soil water is limited. This has become the top story as the 2021 drought has continued. Plant roots acquire potassium mostly through a process called diffusion. Diffusion is the slow movement of ions through water around soil particles to the plant root for uptake. As soil becomes drier, the thickness of the water film around soil particles becomes thinner and thinner, thus the diffusion path for potassium ions becomes longer and longer. The soil pore space becomes mostly air with little water remaining. This ultimately slows the rate at which potassium from soil or fertilizer can reach the plant root, and potassium deficiency may occur.

The consequence of the drought-induced potassium deficiency is two-fold because potassium also plays an essential role in plant water regulation. Potassium-stressed plants experience reduced photosynthesis and transpiration rates, resulting in poor water use efficiency of the already limited soil water that is available. In a nutshell, low soil water content reduces potassium availability from soil and fertilizer, and then the soil water that is there is poorly utilized because of the lack of potassium. In addition to limited soil water, other factors compound to reduce potassium uptake: soil test K, soil texture, clay mineralogy, soil compaction, and even fluffy soil syndrome.

Believe it or not, fluffy soil syndrome has been a component of more than one phone call concerning potassium deficiency. Do you see greener plants near the planter wheel tracks or sprayer tracks? Fluffy soil syndrome occurs when soil has not completely settled since spring tillage, which results in poor soil particle-to-particle contact and slow soil-water-root diffusion routes for potassium ions. The wheel tracks adequately firmed the soil to provide good soil particle-to-particle contact, maintaining better potassium diffusion.

Potassium deficiency in corn: A case study

In June 2021, AGVISE started to receive plant and soil samples to diagnose suspected potassium deficiencies in various crops. This corn example from west central Minnesota included plant and soil samples collected in the good and poor areas of the field. The leaf K concentration was 0.59% in the good and 0.52% in the poor area. For comparison, the corn leaf K sufficiency range at this growth sage should be 2-3% K. The corresponding soil samples had soil test K at 148 ppm in the good and 140 ppm in the poor area. The soil test K critical level for corn is 150-200 ppm, and the farmer had applied 50 lb/acre K2O broadcast + incorporation, which is very close to the university sufficiency guideline for corn. Although the farmer more or less did everything right for a normal rainfall year, drought conditions have reduced potassium availability to the point where potassium deficiency symptoms were apparent and visible.

One week after the plant and soil samples were collected, the field received an inch of rain, and the potassium deficiency symptoms disappeared! The entire corn field is green now. It is amazing what a little water will fix.

Potassium deficiency in corn confirmed with plant and soil analysis. Potassium-deficient corn plant (left) displays chlorosis and necrosis of the outer leaf margin and wavy leaf edge. Plant and soil samples were collected June 2021 in west central Minnesota.

Correcting the problem

So, what do you do next? Do you try to apply an in-season rescue potassium fertilizer application? You still need rain to water in any fertilizer applied to the soil surface. If you had applied an adequate amount of potassium fertilizer before planting, then the appropriate decision is to wait for rain to improve soil and fertilizer potassium availability. However, some people may not have applied enough potassium initially. In these cases, a rescue application of 60 lb/acre K2O broadcast (100 lb/acre potash, 0-0-60) followed by some rain should correct the symptoms. Do not skimp with anything less because you are already behind the eight-ball and you will need that much material to cover the soil surface adequately and affect enough individual corn plants. In NDSU research (2014-2016), an uncorrected potassium deficiency in corn could cost 20-30 bushel/acre compared to corn receiving adequate potassium fertilizer.

For liquid materials, potassium acetate and potassium thiosulfate could be dribbled between the rows, but the potassium rate will need to be similar to the dry potassium fertilizer rate and cost will likely be greater. Remember, potassium is something required in large quantities, not something corrected with a small application of 5-10 lb/acre K2O.

There is no way we could have planned for the very dry conditions that are exacerbating potassium deficiency symptoms across the region. For the future, the best preventative strategy is precision soil sampling (grid or zone) and fertilizing accordingly. It is important to identify and address those parts of fields where potassium may be limiting crop yield potential and spend fertilizer dollars where needed.

Plant Sampling Basics – Sampling, storing, and shipping plant samples

Plant sampling season is in full swing. Agronomists submit plant samples for analysis for a number of reasons: to confirm visible nutrient deficiency symptoms, to detect “hidden hungers”, and to monitor or fine-tune fertilizer plans. For whatever reason you plan to take plant samples, here is a quick refresher on sampling, storing, and shipping plant samples to AGVISE Laboratories.

Sampling

Collecting the correct plant part is critical for interpreting plant analysis results. Make sure to identify the current plant growth stage and follow the directions for that specific crop and growth stage, displayed on the back of the AGVISE plant sample bag. Do you need AGVISE plant sample bags? You can request them here. If you are sampling a crop not listed on the plant sample bag, please call one of our laboratories for instructions.

 

Plant sampling instructions on the back of AGVISE Laboratories plant sample bag. Please use an AGVISE Laboratories bag to submit plant samples for analysis. We send them to AGVISE customers at no charge. Request them here.

Collect the number of plants or leaves indicated in the instructions. This ensures you have a good sample and that we have enough plant material at the laboratory to analyze. About 2 cups of plant material are typically enough.

Roughly 2 cups of plant material (above) are what we require to complete the laboratory analysis.

Storing – Plant Sample Care

  • Brush off excess soil from plant material before placing it in the bag.
  • PLEASE use AGVISE plant sample bags to submit samples. The backside has the required submission form.
  • If you do not have an AGVISE plant sample bag, use a paper bag with holes poked in for ventilation.
  • DO NOT use plastic bags. Plastic bags trap moisture, increasing the likelihood of plant material decomposition during storage and transit.
  • If you are unable to ship plant samples to the laboratory immediately, store them in a refrigerator (do not freeze).
  • It is okay for plant samples to sit outside of a refrigerator in a ventilated bag.
  • Ensure all plant samples have your AGVISE account number in the submitter section. If you do not have an account number, please include your name, phone number, and address on the sample bag.

Shipping – United States Customers

United States customers can send their plant samples to either AGVISE laboratory. Shipping addresses for both are listed at the end of this email. You can ship samples to us via your preferred parcel carrier (e.g. USPS, UPS, FedEx, Spee-Dee, etc.). The sooner the sample arrives at the laboratory after being collected, the better. If you are sending multiple samples together in a box, do not pack samples too tightly in the box; leave room for some airflow.

Shipping – Canadian Customers

Canadian customers can drop off plant samples at any of the four Manitoba AGVISE dropbox locations: Portage la Prairie, Carman, Altona, or Winkler (see location info here). During the summer, the AGVISE route truck picks up samples from these locations on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. It is best to place your sample(s) in the dropbox the night before the route truck is scheduled. As long as the plant sample bag is ventilated, the sample will be okay sitting in the dropbox overnight. Samples dropped off in Winkler and Portage la Prairie can be placed inside refrigerators at the dropbox locations.

If you are located farther away from the Manitoba dropbox locations, please send your plant samples by Purolator ONLY to AGVISE Laboratories, 380 Kimberly Road, Winkler, MB R6W 0H7.

Additional information on sampling, storing, and shipping plant samples to AGVISE Laboratories can be found in the AGVISE Plant Sampling Guide.

Please contact us if you have any questions on plant sampling and analysis or need any supplies.

Feed Nitrate Testing in a Drought Year

Drought is an unwelcome but well-known phenomenon on the Northern Plains and Canadian Prairies. Rainfall has been sparse and scattered across the region, and high temperatures exceeding 90 to 100° F (32 to 38° C) have already caused stress to young crops. These same stresses have also wracked pastures, prompting livestock producers to think about alternative feed options for cattle. Believe it or not, we have already received questions from farmers and ranchers about decisions to cut and bale or graze small grain fields for livestock feed.

When drought-stressed annual crops (e.g., wheat, barley, oat, corn) are cut or grazed, producers must exercise caution about livestock nitrate poisoning when feeding these forages. Drought-stressed crops often accumulate nitrate because plant uptake of nitrate exceeds plant growth and nitrogen utilization. Nitrate is usually concentrated in lower plant parts (lower stem or stalk). When livestock, particularly sheep and cattle, ingest forages with a high nitrate content, nitrate poisoning can occur if large amounts of nitrate convert to nitrite in their digestive system.

Dry soil conditions and high soil nitrate levels favor plant accumulation of nitrate. There is one upside to very dry soil conditions: Some soils may not have had enough soil water to convert all nitrogen fertilizer from the ammonium form to the nitrate form, especially if nitrogen fertilizer was applied in a concentrated band that delays nitrification. Therefore, this may limit the amount of soil nitrate available for plant uptake and accumulation. Regardless, there is still variation across the landscape, and a feed nitrate analysis is the best method to assess livestock nitrate poisoning risk.

When collecting plant material for nitrate analysis, collect the plant parts that the livestock will eat. If plant material will be grazed, recall that lower plant parts contain higher nitrate concentrations; monitor grazing height closely. If plant material will be cut and baled, you should collect plant material above the cutter bar height. Alternatively, plant material can be sampled with a hay probe after being baled.

For the fastest turnaround, submit feed materials for nitrate analysis using a plant sample bag. Write “feed nitrate” for crop choice and select “nitrate-nitrogen” as the analysis option. 

AGVISE Laboratories offers next-day turnaround for feed nitrate analysis. Rapid turnaround on nitrate analysis is important for producers debating to cut and bale or graze small grains or corn as livestock feed.  We also provide livestock water analysis, which includes total dissolved solids, nitrate, and sulfate, to assess livestock drinking water quality. Please call AGVISE staff in Northwood, ND (701-587- 6010) or Benson, MN (320-843-4109) with questions about nitrate, feed/hay quality, or water analysis. We can send you sampling supplies if needed.

AGVISE Laboratories Online Supplies Store

2021 Plant Nutrient Deficiency Troubleshooting Project

Plant analysis is a valuable tool for managing plant nutrients and troubleshooting agronomic problems. Being certain that a specific plant nutrient is causing deficiency symptoms is difficult with visual symptoms alone. Many causal agents unrelated to soil fertility can cause symptoms that appear to be nutrient-related. There are also some plant nutrient deficiencies that are impossible to determine visually so we call them a “hidden hunger.” For troubleshooting situations, you will need a pair of good and bad plant samples, along with good and bad soil samples, to discover the real answer to what is happening in the field (nutrient deficiency or something else).

To help you troubleshoot problem areas and get familiar with plant analysis, AGVISE Laboratories is sponsoring the Plant Nutrient Deficiency Troubleshooting Project in 2021. We are looking to work with 50 to 100 customers this summer who see apparent nutrient deficiency symptoms in one of their fields and want to be involved in this educational project. Volunteering in this project will help you figure out if a problem area in a field is caused by a plant nutrient deficiency or something else. If you want to volunteer, contact one of our agronomists or soil scientists in Northwood (701-587-6010) or Benson (320-843-4109) as soon as you have a problem area you want to troubleshoot for this project. Immediacy is key for good data. The results may be inconclusive if you wait to take plant samples 7 to 10 days after symptoms first appear because new problems can arise.

Once you have spoken with one of our staff and described the problem in your field, we will send you the supplies packet to submit good and bad plant samples, as well as good and bad soil samples (0- 6 inch). If you can provide us with good photographs to aid in the problem diagnosis, we will cover the soil and plant analysis fees (two complete tissue analyses and two complete soil analyses; $151.20 USD retail value).

It is important to catch plant nutrient deficiencies early while you still have time to make a rescue fertilizer application. Take advantage of the AGVISE Plant Nutrient Deficiency Troubleshooting Project and solve those problems the right way… right away.

AGVISE Potato Petiole Analysis: Informative, Accessible, and Easy-to-Understand Reports

For potato petiole analysis article

Irrigated potato production is an intensive cropping system. It requires proactive labor, critical decision-making tools, and well-timed nutrient management. There is a fine line between supplying adequate plant nutrition and applying too much, which could cause potato tuber defects like mishappen tubers or hollow heart, reducing the marketable potato yield.

Before seed potatoes go in the ground, potato agronomists begin with a good soil fertility plan based on precision soil sampling (grid or zone). Once potatoes have emerged, the next step is monitoring the soil and plant nutrient status to ensure the potato crop has no deficient or excess nutritional problems. The in-season monitoring is done with paired potato petiole and soil samples. The petiole and soil sampling starts about 30 days after emergence, then taken every week during the growing season.

A successful in-season potato monitoring program requires fast turnaround and reliable service on petiole and soil samples. This is where AGVISE Laboratories has excelled in serving the potato industry because we know the petiole and soil test results will be used immediately to make fertilizer and irrigation decisions on the fly. To make the data immediately available, the petiole and soil test results are posted online to the AGVISE website with next-day turnaround after the samples arrive at the laboratory.

It is also critical that the petiole and soil test results are easy to interpret and understandable to everyone on the agronomy staff. The AGVISE petiole and soil test report displays results in a graphic format, enabling agronomists to quickly evaluate plant nutrient levels and watch trends over the growing season. An example potato petiole and soil nutrient report is shown below. The report includes a weekly graph of petiole nitrate, phosphorus, and potassium alongside with soil ammonium- and nitrate-nitrogen.

For most irrigated potato producers, weekly potato petiole sampling is a given. But, an increasing number are also including soil samples for ammonium- and nitrate-nitrogen analysis each week. The soil nitrogen data is critical for timing an in-season nitrogen application. There are periods where very fast potato vegetative growth can cause unusually low petiole nitrate-nitrogen levels. The soil nitrogen data prevents overreaction to low petiole nitrate-nitrogen levels and avoids application of extra nitrogen, which could create potential tuber quality issues down the road.

AGVISE Laboratories has provided potato petiole and soil analysis services to the potato industry in the United States and Canada for over 40 years. In 2020, we analyzed over 12,000 potato petiole samples for potato growers at our Northwood, ND and Benson, MN laboratories. We know that timely information is important to our customers, and we are always making improvements to our service and support. If you have any questions, please talk with one of our agronomists or soil scientists about getting started with potato petiole analysis.

For potato petiole article

Molybdenum: The Micro-est of Micronutrients

Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential plant nutrient, necessary for nitrate assimilation and biological nitrogen fixation. Legumes, relying on symbiotic nitrogen fixation, have greater Mo requirement than non-legumes. Nevertheless, the Mo requirement of plants is the lowest among all micronutrients, with critical deficiency concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 ppm in plant leaves. The very low Mo concentration lies near the detection limit for most laboratory instruments used in commercial soil and plant analysis, so you may see Mo concentration reported as “below instrument detection limit.”

Plant-available Mo in soil is present as molybdate (MoO42-). Unlike most other micronutrients, molybdate availability in soil increases with soil pH. On soils with pH greater than 6.0, Mo deficiency is exceptionally rare. In the northern Great Plains and Canadian Prairies where most soils have high pH, Mo deficiency is virtually unknown, and background plant Mo concentration in legumes ranges from 4 to 8 ppm, indicating that plants obtain sufficient Mo from soil naturally. In the upper Midwest where low pH soils are more common, crop response to Mo fertilization has been limited to legume crops grown on strongly acidic, sandy or peat soils.

Since Mo deficiency is so uncommon and most soils are limed above pH 6.0, no reliable plant-available soil test method for Mo has been developed in the region. The acid ammonium oxalate method was infrequently used in the southeast United States, but the prediction of crop response to Mo fertilization aligns more closely with soil pH than soil test Mo. If soil pH is less than 6.0 and Mo fertilization is necessary, a molybdate fertilizer seed treatment or foliar application is usually sufficient. Overapplication of Mo fertilizer is not a concern for grain production. In forage production however, overapplication is a serious concern because excessive Mo in forages can cause Mo-induced copper deficiency (molybdenosis) in ruminant livestock.

AGVISE Laboratories: Trusted by University and Industry Researchers

While you may know AGVISE Laboratories for the soil and plant analysis services we provide you and your producers, AGVISE also has a long history of supporting university and industry research. For the past 30 years, many university-operated soil testing laboratories have closed in the region. This has left a gap in the on- and off-campus research capacities at some institutions. To help bridge the gap, AGVISE partners with university and industry researchers to provide the laboratory analysis services they need to further research in soil fertility, plant nutrition, nutrient use efficiency, and many other areas. Researchers choose AGVISE for their research projects because of our reliability, consistence, and standard of excellence.

Each year, AGVISE analyzes thousands of soil and plant samples for researchers across the United States and Canada. You may have even heard of some recent research projects for which we provided the analysis services. A unique collaborative project was the Public–Industry Partnership for Enhancing Corn Nitrogen Research, which included eight land-grant universities and USDA-ARS. AGVISE analyzed thousands of soil and plant samples for researchers from the University of Illinois, Purdue University (Indiana), Iowa State University, University of Minnesota, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, North Dakota State University, and University of Wisconsin. We are proud of our small part in support of this research that provided critical information to corn producers and helping them improve nitrogen management. You can read more about the project in the links below.

Another research project that AGVISE is helping with is the Potato Soil Health Project, supported by USDA-NIFA Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) and spearheaded by the potato industry. The research project includes eight potato-growing states across a range of diverse soils. In addition to soil fertility analysis, AGVISE is also helping evaluate soil health using biological activity (24-h CO2 respiration), active carbon (POXC), bioavailable nitrogen (ACE), and soil aggregate stability. AGVISE Laboratories is a strong supporter of soil health research, and we are excited to have been chosen to provide soil health analyses for the research project.

In addition to these large research projects, AGVISE also provides analysis services for many research organizations and universities throughout the region, including Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, University of Manitoba, Montana State University, University of Saskatchewan, and South Dakota State University.

The next time you send your soil or plant samples to AGVISE Laboratories, you can be confident that you will be receiving the highest quality analyses and service, just like we provide to researchers across the United States and Canada.

Some open-access articles from AGVISE-supported university research projects

A Public-Industry Partnership for Enhancing Corn Nitrogen Research and Datasets: Project Description, Methodology, and Outcomes

When to Use a Single or Split Application of Nitrogen Fertilizer in Corn

Which Recommendation Tools Are Best for Achieving the Economically Optimal Nitrogen Rate?

The Potato Soil Health Project funded through USDA-NIFA SCRI

 

Plant Analysis Sampling Guide

Plant nutrient analysis is a useful management tool. The AGVISE Plant Analysis Sampling Guide discusses the importance of plant analysis in proper crop nutrition and how to collect plant
samples. It is important to collect the correct plant part at the correct plant growth stage to ensure accurate interpretation of plant analysis results. To ensure we have enough plant material to analyze in the laboratory, please collect a minimum number of whole plants or leaves per sample as instructed in the guide. To obtain the most accurate plant analysis information, follow the instructions on plant growth stage, plant part, and minimum sample size.

View the Plant Tissue Sampling Guide